Monthly Archives: August 2014

Receiving an Obamacare Subsidy? Lookout for form 1095-A

Form 1095-A: New challenge for HealthCare.gov: Tax forms – Yahoo Finance.

The forms are called 1095-As, and list who in each household has health coverage, and how much the government paid each month to subsidize those insurance premiums. Nearly 5 million people have gotten subsidies through HealthCare.gov.

If the forms are delayed past their Jan. 31 deadline, some people may have to wait to file tax returns — and collect their refunds.

A delay of a week or two may not sound like much, but many people depend on their tax refunds to plug holes in family finances.

I feel comfortable predicting some level of chaos. I find it hard to believe that the Department of Health and Human Services, or the state exchanges, are going to suddenly start operating like a well oiled machine when it comes to sending out 1095-A forms.

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Obamacare subsidy? Make sure the Exchange has your income correct

Tax refunds may get hit due to health law credits – Yahoo Finance.

Here’s why: If your income for 2014 is going to be higher than you estimated when you applied for health insurance, then complex connections between the health law and taxes can reduce or even eliminate your tax refund next year.

Maybe you’re collecting more commissions in an improving economy. Or your spouse got a better job. It could trigger an unwelcome surprise.

The danger is that as your income grows, you don’t qualify for as much of a tax credit. Any difference will come out of your tax refund, unless you have promptly reported the changes.

If your income has changed significantly, either up or down, contact healthcare.gov or your state exchange. In Colorado, you can reach the Connect for Health Colorado “marketplace” at 855.752.6749.

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Vermont fires creator of its ‘unacceptable,’ glitchy ObamaCare site

What month is this? Oh yea, August and open enrollment starts in a little over 3 months. Vermont fires creator of its ‘unacceptable,’ glitchy ObamaCare site | Fox News.

An estimated 14,000 Vermonters are tied up in “change of circumstance” glitches with Vermont Health Connect. Since CGI launched the site this past October, health officials have received a steady stream of complaints from people unable to make adjustments to plans online.

Chief of Health Care Reform Lawrence Miller explained CGI’s firing in a statement to press.

“For many, Vermont Health Connect works as it should. For others, the system is still failing them and causing deep frustration. That is unacceptable to me, and we will explore every option and take every step to make this system work for all Vermonters,” he said. “Today’s changes are steps in that direction and more can be expected in the coming weeks.”

The Colorado Exchange, Connect for Health Colorado, uses the same contractor as Vermont, Massachusetts, healthcare.gov and Hawaii, CGI. CGI has now been terminated from Vermont, Massachusetts and healthcare.gov.

If I had to say…. being able to change coverage in the middle of a policy period is a Qualifying Life Event and I don’t believe changes have gone all that smoothly in Colorado either. They do seem to have initial sign ups under control if you can do the Medicaid dance.  Uugh.

 

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Oregon Medicaid system – slow motion crash

Oregon feels the strain after health care overhaul floods the system with Medicaid enrollees | OregonLive.com.

Low-income Oregon residents were supposed to be big winners after the state expanded Medicaid under the federal health care overhaul and created a new system to improve the care they received.

However, an Associated Press review shows that an unexpected rush of enrollees has strained the capacity of the revamped network that was endorsed as a potential national model, locking out some patients, forcing others to wait months for medical appointments and prompting a spike in emergency room visits, which state officials had been actively seeking to avoid.

And how many new enrollees did it take to “crash the system”?

Under the federal overhaul, the state this year added nearly 360,000 people to the Oregon Health Plan, its version of Medicaid. It was more than twice the number projected and swelled the state Medicaid rolls to nearly 1 million people, about a quarter of the state’s population.

A quarter of the state’s population. That’s a big problem and a lot of people expecting the government to provide them with free health care.

 

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