Dilemma over deductibles: The flip/flop in health care..

Dilemma over deductibles: Costs crippling middle class.

Physician Praveen Arla is witnessing a reversal of health care fortunes: Poor, long-uninsured patients are getting Medicaid through Obamacare and finally coming to his office for care. But middle-class workers are increasingly staying away.

“It’s flip-flopped,” says Arla, who helps his father run a family practice in Hillview, Ky. Patients with job-based plans, he says, will say: ” ‘My deductible is so high. I’m trying to come to the doctor as little as possible. … What is the minimum I can get done?’ They’re really worried about cost.” (emphasis added)

The issues is deductibles…

A recent Commonwealth Fund survey found that four in 10 working-age adults skipped some kind of care because of the cost, and other surveys have found much the same. The portion of workers with annual deductibles — what consumers must pay before insurance kicks in — rose from 55% eight years ago to 80% today, according to research by the Kaiser Family Foundation. And a Mercer study showed that 2014 saw the largest one-year increase in enrollment in “high-deductible plans” — from 18% to 23% of all covered employees.

Meanwhile the size of the average deductible more than doubled in eight years, from $584 to $1,217 for individual coverage. Add to this co-pays, co-insurance and the price of drugs or procedures not covered by plans — and it’s all too much for many Americans.

I have to say, I would LOVE to have a plan with deductibles this low. Perhaps the issue is the expectation of the typical American that someone else is supposed to pay for all of their health care.

All that said, I can confidently state that a large portion of my clients have substantially larger deductibles than the averages mentioned above and I can see them delaying medical care.

Moving on the article asks the important question, albeit a bit to generally: “Why is this happening?”

Why is this happening? Many patients and doctors blame corporate greed — a view insurers and business leaders reject. Some employers in turn blame the Affordable Care Act, saying it has forced them to pare down generous plans so they don’t have to pay a “Cadillac tax” on high-cost coverage in 2018. But health care researchers point to a convergence of trends building for years: the steep rise in deductibles even as premiums stabilize, corporate belt-tightening since the economic downturn and stagnant middle-class wages.

“It’s a case of companies trying to offer workers health insurance and still generate profit,” said Eric Wright, a professor of sociology and public health at Georgia State University. “But whenever costs go up for the consumers across the board … it promotes a delay in care.”

Others disagree, saying that when people pay for their care, they shop more intelligently. Chris Riedl, Aetna’s head of product strategy for its national accounts, says her company’s research does not indicate that insured patients are showing up sick in emergency rooms with long-neglected illnesses — which to her means, “intuitively, they’re not avoiding care.”

But many doctors contend it’s only a matter of time before the middle class begins crowding ERs. They say putting off care can be dangerous, exponentially more costly and, if it continues and spreads, can threaten the health of the nation.

Read the whole thing. This is a fairly well rounded article that takes a look from all sides.

 

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